Difference between revisions of "Why Asynchronous DNS"

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(cleanup, added xrefs to RFC 3263 and the svn repository)
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resiprocate uses the ares asynchronous dns library from MIT. We use a forked version of ares that is in the contrib subdirectory of the resip project. The main differences between the MIT version and the resip forked version are that numerous bugs have been fixed particularly on win32 architectures and IPV6 support has been added.  
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SIP clients and servers can use DNS to resolve URIs for locating next hops. Details are covered in [http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3263.txt RFC 3263].  
  
It is impossible to know ahead of time how long a dns query will take. If the dns client library is synchronous care must be taken in the application to avoid blocking while a result is being retrieved. There are two methods of dealing with this problem: asynchronous blah, blah, blah
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ReSIProcate uses a forked version of the ares asynchronous DNS library originally from MIT. This forked version is located in [https://scm.sipfoundry.org/rep/resiprocate/main/contrib/ares the contrib subdirectory of reSIProcate's svn repository]. The reSIProcate version offers the following over the MIT version:
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:* numerous bug fixes, particularly on win32 architectures
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:* support of IPV6
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<!-- It is impossible to know ahead of time how long a DNS query will take. If the DNS client library is synchronous, care must be taken in the application to avoid blocking while a result is being retrieved. There are two methods of dealing with this problem: asynchronous blah, blah, blah -->

Revision as of 12:42, 9 February 2006

SIP clients and servers can use DNS to resolve URIs for locating next hops. Details are covered in RFC 3263.

ReSIProcate uses a forked version of the ares asynchronous DNS library originally from MIT. This forked version is located in the contrib subdirectory of reSIProcate's svn repository. The reSIProcate version offers the following over the MIT version:

  • numerous bug fixes, particularly on win32 architectures
  • support of IPV6